Sunday, 3 January 2021

Lunar X and V Times for 2021

Lunar X and V Times for 2021

Lunar X and V photos

The Lunar X and V are transient Clair Obscur effects which are visible on the lunar surface once a month for about four hours. The “X” is caused by light illuminating the rims of craters Blanchinus, La Caille and Purback. The “V” is caused by light illuminating crater Ukert along with several smaller craters.  The X is at its most striking when it is visible on the shadow side of the terminator (as shown above) but they will remain visible against the lunar surface for a few hours even after the terminator has moved over them if you know where to look (see photo below). The X is located about a quarter of the way up from the bottom, just inside the shadow side of the terminator. The V is approximately half way up just inside the illuminated side of the terminator, and it really shines bright against the darker background of Mare Vaporum. If you know where to look, you will be able to spot them with binoculars (it will help if they are mounted) but they are best viewed through a telescope.

Lunar X and V photo

The X and V are visible some time close to the First Quarter phase, however, due to libration, the exact time that they are visible is different from month to month. The lunar phase illumination during which they can be seen during 2021 varies between 41% and 55% illuminated.

To figure out what time the X and V become visible each month, I used the NASA Scientific Visualisation Studio Moon Phase and Libration tool for 2021 (https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/4874 ) I did this by scrolling through hour by hour near to First Quarter until I could see the X become visible; the V tends to become visible a little earlier than the X. This is an approximate start time, and they should be visible for a few hours after this.  There is no fixed end-time listed because as mentioned above, these features remain visible even after the terminator moves across them, but if you assume they are visible for around four hours from the start time, you will see them at their best.

Lunar X and V November 2020

Although the X and V occur every month, the time may be before the Moon has risen or after it has set from your location, so you will not see them every month. Sometimes they are visible on a daytime Moon, when they are much more difficult to observe and photograph. The times given are in 24 hour clock and are in UT/GMT (and BST where appropriate) so you will need to correct for time zones and daylight time savings changes if you are not in the UK. I have also included the approximate moonrise and moonset times in the table. These times were for London, UK so your exact rise and set time will vary depending on where you are in the UK. You can check sunrise and set times for your location here:
https://www.timeanddate.com/moon/uk/london   

Date

Start

Moonrise

Moonset

Visible UK?

% illuminated

20th Jan

18:00 UT

11:12 UT

00:51 UT

Y

49%

19th Feb

08:00 UT

10:08 UT

02:01 UT

Y
rising day

46%

20th Mar

22:00 UT

09:00 UT

02:00 UT

Y

43.5%

19th  Apr

11:00 UT
12:00 BST

09:10 UT
10:10 BST

03:27 UT
04:27 BST

Y
day

42%

18th  May

23:00 UT
00:00 BST

10:12 UT
11:12 BST

02:32 UT
03:32 BST

Y
setting

41.5%

17th  Jun

11:00 UT
12:00 BST

11:50 UT
12:50 BST

01:37 UT
02:37 BST

Y
rising day

42.5%

16th  Jul

23:00 UT
00:00 BST

12:16 UT
13:16 BST

00:16 UT
01:16 BST

Y
setting

45%

15th  Aug

10:00 UT
11:00 BST

14:13 UT
15:13 BST

23:21 UT
00:21 BST

N

47.5%

13th  Sept

22:00 UT
23:00 BST

14:50 UT
15:50 BST

22:29 UT
23:29 BST

Y
setting

51%

13th  Oct

10:00 UT
11:00 BST

15:53 UT
16:53 BST

23:27 UT
00:27 BST

N

53%

11th  Nov

23:00 UT

14:01 UT

22:53 UT

N

55%

11th  Dec

12:00 UT

13:01 UT

00:30 UT

Y
rising day

55%

Technically, there are nine months of 2021 when the X and V are visible. However, as stated above, Clair Obscur effects are difficult to observe on a daytime Moon, but they are also harder to observe when the Moon is very low because of atmospheric disturbances.  In February, June and December they will be visible on a rising daytime Moon and this will be a challenge for most observers. In July and September, they will be visible on a night-time Moon but only for a short time before the Moon sets.  By far the best months to see the X and V will be January and March.

It’s really great fun to observe how the Lunar X and V regions evolve over time, so if you do make the effort to see them when they first appear, make sure you check that region again periodically to see how things have changed.  The sketches below show how different the Lunar X region can look once the terminator has passed over it. If you enjoy observing the X and V, there many other Clair Obscur effects that are well worth seeking out. There is comprehensive list of them on Wikipedia here.

I really hope you found this post helpful. Please feel free to share it with anybody who may find it useful.

Clear skies!

Mary McIntyre FRAS

Pastel Sketches of the Lunar X and V


Tuesday, 31 March 2020

Venus's Close Encounter with The Pleiades


Venus’s Close Encounter with The Pleiades


Venus and Messier 45 the Pleiades by Mary McIntyre, 2nd April 2020

The path of Venus during the first half of April. Map created by Mark McIntyre using Star-Charter

During the first week of April, observers will be treated to an awesome spectacle in the western sky after sunset.  The stars within Messier 45, the Pleiades, will be joined by the extremely bright planet Venus. This open cluster which is also known as the Seven Sisters, is a firm favourite amongst astronomers because the gas and dust around the young, hot and blue stars are very striking in long exposure photographs.  



Venus moving through the Pleiades - 1st - 5th April.
Animation created by Mary McIntyre using Stellarium and PIPP

Venus is currently blazing around mag -4.5 and on 2nd, 3rd and 4th of April it passes very close to the Pleiades. The animation above shows the position of Venus from 1st – 5th April. On 3rd April it is at its closest and will look like an extra “star” within the cluster. The picture below shows the closest approach on 3rd April.  



The position of Venus and the Pleiades at 21:00 BST 3rd April 2020

Screenshot from Stellarium


It’s not unusual for Venus to be visible in the same part of the sky as the Pleiades, but it’s only once every 8 years that it passes this close to the cluster, and it always occurs in early April. This is due to the orbital resonance between Venus and the Earth. This ratio is 13:8, which means that Venus orbits the Sun 13 times in the time it takes the Earth to orbit 8 times. The next close conjunction will occur on 4th April 2028.


The conjunction can be seen with the naked eye, but it will look even better if you observe it with a pair of binoculars or a small telescope and it will make a fantastic photo opportunity!  Venus and the Pleiades will become visible in the West after the Sun sets. The best time to view them will be around 21:00 – 21:30 BST but they will remain visible until they set at around 23:30 BST.

Mary McIntyre FRAS
www.marymcintyreastronomy.co.uk




Messier 45 the Pleiades by Mary and Mark McIntyre, October 2016


Friday, 20 December 2019

Lunar X and V Times for 2020


Lunar X & V Times 2020

The Lunar X and V are transient lunar features which are visible on the lunar surface for about 4 hours, once a month. They are caused by sunlight illuminating the edge of craters. The “X” is caused by light illuminating the rims of craters Blanchinus, La Caille and Purback. The “V” is caused by light illuminating crater Ukert along with several smaller craters.  They are at their most striking when they are visible on the shadow side of the terminator, but they will remain visible against the lunar surface even after the terminator has moved because they are brighter than the surrounding area.


Lunar X & V - 11th May 2019 by Mary McIntyre



The X and V are usually visible a few hours before First Quarter phase, however, due to libration, the exact time of the X and V being visible is different from month to month. I initially used the Lunar Terminator Visualisation Tool to get the approximate times of the X and V, then as I did in previous years, I used the NASA Scientific Visualisation Studio Moon Phase and Libration tool for 2020 (https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/4768) to check the start times. I did this by scrolling through hour by hour on the date of the X and V to ensure I had the most accurate times for the X and V becoming visible.  The times I recorded are listed below.  There is no fixed end time listed because as mentioned above, these features remain visible even after the terminator moves across them. But if you assume they are visible for around four hours from the start time, you will see them at their best.


The Lunar X and V on the illuminated side of the terminator, 5th May 2017
By Mary McIntyre

Although the X and V occur every month, the time may be before the Moon has risen or after it has set from your location, so you will not see them every month. They may also be visible during daylight, and they are more difficult to observe and photograph on a daytime Moon.  Please also note that the times given are in 24 clock and are in UT (the same as GMT) so you will need to correct for time zones and daylight time savings changes. I have included the approximate moonrise and moonset times from Oxfordshire, UK and a note about when the X and V are visible from the UK.  

Date
Start Time of X & V
Moonrise
Moonset
Visible From UK?
2nd January
20:00 UT
11:50
23:50
Y
1st February
10:00 UT
10:50
00:55
Y (Day)
1st / 2nd March
23:30 UT
09:35
01:00
N
31st March
13:00 UT / 14:00 BST
10:10
03:10
Y (Day)
30th April
01:45 UT / 02:45 BST
11:00
03:20
N
29th May
13:45 UT / 14:45 BST
11:20
02:20
Y (Day)
28th June
01:30 UT / 02:30 BST
13:10
01:30
N
27th July
13:00 UT / 14:00 BST
13:40
00:15
Y (Day)
26th August
00:30 UT / 01:30 BST
15:35
23:45
N
24th September
13:00 UT / 14:00 BST
15:45
23:20
Y (Day)
24th October
01:30 UT / 02:30 BST
15:51
00:30
N
22nd November
14:30 UT
13:45
23:40
Y
22nd December
04:30 UT
12:45
01:00
N

There are seven occasions during 2020 when the X and V are visible from the UK, but unfortunately only two of those occasions coincide with a night time Moon, the first being on 2nd January from 20:00 UT. The second occasion is on 22nd November when they first become visible during daylight, but by 17:00 UT it should be dark enough to make it easier to spot them.  However, if you have good binoculars or a telescope you will still able to observe the X and V on a daytime Moon, so please do try to find them on those dates too.


The Lunar X & V up close 11th May 2019 - by Mary McIntyre